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Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
today in what could be the last chance to come talk before the u.s. falls off the fiscal cliff next week. >>> investors are bracing for the final eurozone bond sale of the year. italy will sell up to 6 billion later today. >> and the yen has been sent lower and stocks to their highest level in 21 months. >>> this is the final "worldwide exchange" from london of the year. louisa is here for it. >> i can't believe it. it's my last working day of the year, as well. >> is it? >> yes. >> unfortunately we'll still be talking about the same thing we're talking about now. >> although i feel we'll be talking more debt ceiling, as well. >> and speaking of which, president obama is trying a last ditch effort to restart budget talks days before the u.s. goes over the fiscal cliff. speaker john boehner has called the house back into session sunday evening. house majority leader eric cantor is telling his members to be prepared to work through january 2nd. both sides are still far apart on taxes and spending cuts. harry reid says prospect deals by monday are unlikely. minority leader mitch mcconnell s
it in perspective. the euro/u.s. dollar didn't move that much whatsoever. from that point of view, i don't think that we just have to look at today or the last two days of development in euro/u.s. dollar. of course, global trade is really important for the german economy. it continues to be very important. even from a private consumption point of view, we did have quite a bit of support as of late. also because of the wages. and looking at the world bank report, also looking at the asian economies in 2013, 2014, them seeing a little better picture is very good for the german economy and not to speak about the turnaround in the u.s. which seems to be stabilizing, looking this also at the housing market. so business sentiment better than expected. it is rising. the current conditions a little weaker than expected. add to that the financial analyst numbers we had as of late, also better than expected. not too bad. >> patricia, we'll see you again next hour. thank you very much for following all the latest there. >> sure. >>> now, shares in ubs have edged up in early trade after the bank announced a
finds. we see falling u.s. demand, rising supply. we see miles driven. there's technology at play. probably the biggest thing that could happen to the auto industry and we can come on to that. that's only a few years out. the message from the futures market that we're get sg oil should be some $10 to $15 lower. if we were to get $10 off the oil price, it broadly equate toes about 1% gdp surprising the western world. it's that time of year where we're pending our thoughts to next year. tangible, economic prices to next year. it will be oil related, a chance, good job with raising the tax threshold in the uk. that means for the first year in five. uk link will be up, not down. and them i also think thattory thing our chancellor did a good job of was she raised taxes by 10 so companies can invest a 215 pounds, not just 200 pounds. >> that's a leverage the other governments have been trying to pull. but your point is interesting. it's not just the uk we were seeing there. and it goes back to the point you were making about oil. u.s. retail gas prices are down 16% since their peak this
to u.s. exporters may be showing signs of stabilizing, maybe get to growth. so that might mean moderation in the eurozone might ease in the first quarter. but again, this is all dependent on what happens with that ongoing debt crisis and any step back in resolving that would obviously have a knock-on effect to the economy. >> i'm wondering whether germany as we look at -- they're just above sort of recession territory at the moment. i'm wondering whether if they get better growth out of asia, that will offset the weakness that they're seeing in europe enough to keep them above the pencil line. >> what we've seen so far with today's numbers is exports are declining very sharp. they'll need asia and the u.s. to offset some of that demand weakness, but again, the biggest market for most is the euro zone. if the eurozone is performing badly, that will have a thok-on effect for those countries. >> there's a number of strategists saying after the u.s. has sort of led equities for most of the year, they're now saying europe is the place to be. from i think really the question you have
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
after this colorado doctor is rescued from the taliban in a daring mission that cost the life of one u.s. navy seal. the seal, whose name we are just learning today. national security correspondent jennifer griffin is live at the pentagon with more. jennifer? >> reporter: hi, megyn. well, fox news has learned the identity of the u.s. navy seal who died during a daring rescue of an american doctor in eastern afghanistan. petty officer first class nicholas d. check, age 28, of monroeville, pennsylvania. he died of combat-related injuries suffered december 8th. he was assigned to an east coast-based special naval warfare unit. he was a member of the vaunted seal team six, the unit that carried out the raid against usama bin laden. he is not believed to have been a part of that mission. the mission that he was part of was the's rescue and to save the life of dr. dilip joseph, a doctor who was kidnapped last wednesday with two afghan colleagues while returning from kabul. the medical team worked for a nongovernment organization. dr. dilip's two afghan colleagues had been released by the kidna
for the presidential race. walker won the first governor in u.s. history to survive a recall election. and another nod to a republican governor. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and compassion for our state and for the people of our state. >> reporter: new jersey governor chris christie's full-on embrace of president obama for helping sandy-ravaged new jersey came days before the election and had no noticeable effect on the presidential race, but some republicans think christie didn't have to be that efuse sieve. they'll remember if his name pops up in 2016. >> if it's a legitimate rape, the female body has ways to try to shut that whole thing down. >> reporter: from the say what category of entries comes a combo team, missouri senate candidate todd akin and richard murdoch of indiana. >> life is that gift from god, and i think even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that god intended to happen. >> republican dreams to take control of the senate in 2012 had dwipdalled throughout the year, but akin and maur dock pretty much shut that
they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduate education from three years to four years because they think it is not giving students enough time. there are all
it is manufacturing, but is there really a demand question about apple's products that is a real one? >> not in the u.s., but there could be some questions about china, remember that report from steve milanovich? he said apple needs to come up within some real innovations, you need to have some clarity on the pipeline, and you need geographic -- clearance to go into china? yes, it got it with two of the smaller carriers. china confirms talks with apple. but the problem here, he says tech is not an issue, it's mainly about the business model and benefit sharing issues. that could be a problem. >> he is also playing the part of what many analysts are doing, which is let me explain why it's going down, in the same way that the death cross, i always love the death cross, this is a technical term. i can think of a million reasons to sell it. the only reason i want to own it is because it makes the best products in the world and it's inexpensive. >> that's a lot of people looking at the chart. >> look again, the people who own apple, they were the ones who owned it because it was going up. it reminds me very
's not going over well with the rest the world, including the u.s. and china. now we have some of the richest people in the world and they want the government to make more of your money. warren buffett, george soros, bill gates' dad they want the estate tax to go up and say the rate should start at 45% and go up from there. and millions would qualify to pay, but buffett and soros have an estate plan to avoid much of that tax. i'm quoting now, an estate tax with these guidelines to reduce the deficit and fund vital services and paid by only 10% of the estate. work your whole life and half of it goes to the children and half to the government and of course it's already been taxed when you earned it in the first place, is that fair? we're dealing with that today. i'm waiting for my special dividend from microsoft, but the company i own shares in has ramped up production of its new surface tablet. maybe that will help the stock. are you listening, steve ballmer? nicole, pre-market, where is the stock? >> stuart, you're making me laugh already and the show has barely begun. you're waiting for your
, it is not a philanthropic act on the pentagon's part to instruct boeing to build. -- to build in the deficit areas of the u.s. it is pragmatic. the united states federal government -- unless europe is dollarized, unless they do not have dollars to spend purchasing -- unless those who do not have dollars are given dollars to spend purchasing, the net exports of those who have surpluses, then they will stop having surplus. this is the surplus recycling mechanism. thus, we have the 20 years of the golden age. the 1950's and the 1960's. a period of immense stability very low inflation. very low unemployment. universal growth. we had other problems. the lease from the macroeconomic point of view, it was a golden age. why did it end? because the global surplus of recycling mechanism could no longer be sustained. why? because the united states stopped having a surplus by the end of the 1960's. how can you recycle surplus if you cannot have it. -- if you do not have it? enter a young turk in 1971. actually, he was the american, but you know what i mean. well, paul volcker -- that name may ring a bell. in 1971, paul
intervention, more than half say the u.s. and other countries should not send military planes and missiles to help the opposition fighters set up a safety zone. >>> in kabul earlier today an afghan police officer shot and killed an american contractor. this was inside police headquarters. this attack comes just a day after five afghan police, they were killed by their commander who police say was a taliban infiltrator. more than 50 have been killed by inside attacks this year. barbara starr, this is one of the main concerns as you know of the police of the forces, the international forces inside of afghanistan. you've got these rouge actors that infiltrate and are a part of killing what they -- these inside killings, the green on blue and blue on blue. tell us what happened. >> there's very little information available so far, suzanne. as you said, someone in an afghan police uniform. what is so interesting about this tragic incident is it was a woman in an afghan police uniform. whether she was a member of the afghan police or perhaps an infiltrator that stole the uniform somehow i think
. these are the carpets that are exported to the u.s. and put in our sitting rooms. this is often the production environment. a local product type of south asia cigarette. a hurricane in 2009 wiped out a large swath of southeastern ban gal and the land owners came in and said we will rebuild your home but in exchange for that you have to do this. so they don't get a wage they get a roof. this is a raw tobaccos going into the hands of children. ing a culture is another one. often seasonal contracts they will go between agriculture and carpets dependsing to season. because of the seasonal jumping around and entering into these bondage agreements these are voluntary so i don't know if they count as slavery or forced labor. stone breaking is another big one that has been going on for generations and generations it feeds in the construction industry. they were subject of the second supreme court case on bonded labor in india. 1983 case, someone brought a claim under the bonded labor act in india which was passed in 1976. i went to the same one three decades later and many of the same conditions still
. >> tell me a little bit more about your research on what the u.s. force presence and the cocoalition force presence might need to be after 2014 and what other, in addition to forces, what other resources do you think that the afghan state will require. >> um -- >> talk about your paper. >> for my paper. as a war college student, aye got to produce -- i've got to produce some sort of research product. they're actually going to hold me accountable for enjoying a year at stanford, california. so my penance is to do some research, and it could be a lot of key strategic issues. what i came to two months ago driving across country with two dogs, two kids, cars, u-haul, trying to find a place to live was, you know, i'm really passionate about the future of afghanistan and pakistan. it matters. so let me do some research on. that lots of issues involved with that. but specifically, what are some of the course of action, if you will, for force structure and mission sets in afghanistan after the combat mission with nato and isaf ends in 2014. and by strange coincidence, our secretary this morning, s
. -- and 2008. the u.s. utilizing its trade deficit with the rest of the world has been operating like a huge vacuum cleaner. sucking into the united states the net exports of europe, japan, and lately china. thus providing exporters -- germany, japan, or china -- with the requisite demand necessary. so, the ever expanding trade deficit was not an accident. it was a very clever way of replacing one that surplus recycling system with another. the first one, it was one where america had a surplus and america decided instead of doing what germany is doing at the moment -- which is cutting its nose to spite its face, and thereby ending the -- entering recession by cutting, cutting, cutting -- volcker as the head of the fed at a different idea. we are going to expand our dominance and are well by -- and our wealth by expanding our deficit and using our deficits to provide the rest of the world with the demand which is necessary to grow their economies, even at the expense of hours. -- ours. and who is going to pay for the deficit? if i have an ever-expanding deficit, the bank tells me it is came o
more than any other. >> what you're looking at here is the grant of honoring u.s. citizenship to winston churchill and of course you have there the citation signed by president kennedy and then the u.s. passport which sadly wynton churchill never used. >> so in other words, as much as churchill loved america, america loved churchill. >> absolutely. and that really is what this exhi business is all about. >> churchill was a great reader and writer of history. he engaged with history. and that's with american history just as much as european history. >> so the bromance between fbr and winston is one of people's favorite stories in the second world war. and here it is, a present from roosevelt to churchill in his 70th birthday. what exactly is it. >> these are lines by abraham lincoln that roosevelt will sent churchill for his 70th birthday and a wonderful inscription where he has written at the bottom for winston on his birthday, i would go even to-- to within him again. >> and church sill someone who lived by his pen. his whole career is underpinned by writing. >> he actually r
clinton made a huge statement today. but the u.s. has to be the leader on syria. >> there are human rights abuses ploding all over the world. in uganda there is a bill that is a homosexual bill that would make those acts punishable by death. >> right here we are working on the farm worker's bill. >> as a kennedy, what do you make of what is going on in washington? >> well, i think it is very, very hard with the tea party. they came to washington to destroy it. >> the american people have spoken and everybody missed teddy. he was great friends with people on both sides of the aisle. >> the rfk center, let's turn to more cheery things. >> if you are watching, get out there and get on that website and bid higher. there is a signed taylor swift guitar. and fly fishing. >> and it is a great cause. www.charitybuzz.com. and finally, let's come to this car accident that you had. because it was a strange case where you had taken an ambien sleeping pill in the morning. >> yes, i reached for my thyroid medication and took the wrong pills. i was on my way to the gym and got into the car and got into a
leader harry reid in the "new york times, returning to the u.s. capitol. his shadow. what's the relationship between harry reid and mitch mcconnell? guest: it's hard to tell. the rhetoric on the senate floor can be pretty tough. they call each other my dear friend whenever you want them on the c-span channels, but i think they both are in a frustrating position. senator harry reid does not have more than 60 members, so we cannot block a filibuster but senator mcconnell is adept at applying in cases where he'd want to block legislation. but i think they both have respect for each other's legislative skills and they have proven in the past that when they need to cut a deal, but can cut a deal and bring their party's members with them. host: john mccain writes a big budget deal is still worth doing. he points out to the history of some of these agreements, most notably with ronald reagan in the 1980's and president bush in 1991 in which republicans agreed to spending cuts that never happened while raising taxes. guest: that's right. there's a little confusion about how much s
. the only reason they're not going to use it is because somebody else, the u.s., has a similar threat of using a similar weapon. as a gun owner, you have to be able to protect yourself. if you are damaged and you are willing to take somebody else's life. that comes down to that person is not going to obey the gun laws. they are going to find a gun or find another weapon. >> i've heard of some stretches, in my time. but stretching from javon belcher and the shooting in syria and chemical weapons seems like a bit of a stretch. the implications of that is that every american should have access to chemical weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they caus
syrian rebels in an effort to end assad's regime. the u.s. doesn't plan to provide arms to the rebels. >>> and from our parade of papers, "the dallas morning news." north korea has defied international warnings, firing another long-range rocket. the second such launch under new leader kim jong-un. korean state tv claims the launch was successful and that the rocket delivered a, quote, peaceful satellite into orbit. >>> this is a big morning now. >> it is. he's here. >> he's here in the flesh in new york city in the studio. >> 12-12-12. happy 12-12-12. >> top 12 reasons, something. >> willie and i since 11-11-11 -- >> i was watching you. >> and we're, like, on the holiday inn over on 57th. we're going to be ready when it's 12-12-12 because that's going to be a special day. we'll make a top 12 list of the things a man should do to -- >> and we want to get this right. >> we're going to get it right. >> because we were so wrong about y2k. >> we really were. >> the millennium. >> we really were. you know what? let's not kill hamlet in the first act. we're going to give you our special top
of breaking and penalized in the u.s. for breaking a law in india. those are the stories we write about. >> host: how come we have not heard about that before? >> guest: some of you have hear. one of them is the case of john and judy, they were selling bunnies in a little down of nixa, missouri, fined $90,000 for having the wrong permit. the government said, hey, pay on the website, $9 o ,000, but if you don't pay, in 30 days, you owe us $3.1 million. this is the stuff that your government's going to bull disguised people, and we frankly think it needs to stop. they are doing the same with taking people's land and saying you can't build it on it because it's a wetland, even though there's no water or stream or pond on the land. >> as a senator, what can you do to change policy? >> we've looked at some of these things, and we now constructed legislation to try to fix them. like on the wetlands, we say the clean water act says you can't discharge pollutants into waters. i don't have a problem with that, but your backyard is not navigable water and dirt is not a pollutant. we have to redef
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)

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